THE POWER OF WATER

Considerations for Stormwater and Erosion Control We have all seen it, large rain storms causing water to move through a site and taking things with it.  Stormwater (water moving on

Did I Just See What I Think I Saw?

Believe it or not, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus mexicanus) may soon be common residents of North Carolina.  Originating in South America, these bony-armored mammals have slowly ambled their way north

Equinox Staff Present at Water Education Summit

Equinox’ very own Fred Grogan, Landscape Architect, and Dena Chandler, LEED Environmental Designer, will be presenting at this year’s Water Education Summit.  Fred will be discussing the impacts global climate

Yellow Birch in the Southern Appalachians

In the early 2000s, Hugh Morton, former owner of Grandfather Mountain  reported an unusual number of large, dead trees high on the slopes of the mountain.  The verbal report was

Our External Response to Climate Change: Part III of III

Ahoy readers!  This blog entry marks the final installment of our 3-part series outlining Equinox’ External Response to Climate Change.  We’ve covered the Conservation Planning and Ecological Services groups, and

Our External Response to Climate Change: Part II of III

Welcome back readers!  We hope you enjoyed last week’s entry which detailed our Conservation Planning Group’s efforts to respond to climate change via proper planning, coordination of groups and their resources, and

Equinox’s Internal Response to Climate Change

Because of our mission, our concern for our environment, and general thriftiness, we at Equinox have always worked to minimize our consumption of resources such as electricity, fossil fuels, and

Climate Change & the National Debt

Like the national debt, climate change seems to be one of those hot-button issues that both polarizes and inflames people. It’s pitiful really. Nothing gets done. Problems get kicked down